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Why Should You Consider Filing A Provisional Patent Application

 

Provisional patent applications can help entrepreneurs beat the clock by establishing important filing dates

Provisional patent applications can help entrepreneurs beat the clock by establishing important filing dates.                                             Image by opensourceway.

Since March 16, 2013, the United States switched from a first-to-inventor to a first-to-file patent system, which means the first inventor to file an application (but not necessarily the first to invent), gets the patent. As a result, it is important to file a patent application to claim priority over the invention soon after the invention is conceived (i.e. once the inventor has created a definite and permanent idea of the complete and operable invention) and capable of being described. Moreover, having an invention that is patent-pending adds value and credibility to a business, which helps the business seek additional financing.

However, filing a regular patent application (i.e. non-provisional) can be very expensive, ranging from several thousand dollars to over twenty thousand dollars, which is often outside a business’ budget, especially in its early stages. Additionally, a non-provisional patent application is examined by the Patent & Trademark Office and an applicant’s responses to the examiner’s rejections also incur significant legal fees. This is where a provisional patent application can come in handy. A provisional patent application allows you (the inventor) to claim priority to the invention (and claim that you have a “patent pending”) and push off some of the costs associated with a non-provisional application.

What is a provisional patent application?

A provisional patent application is a temporary patent application that includes the specification of the invention, including sufficiently detailed description and drawings to allow another to make and use the invention. The drawings can be hand-drawn or computer-created (though the latter may be better for business reasons). Moreover, the applicant does not need to draft any patent claims. Because there is no examination of the patentability of the provisional application at the USPTO, the filing fee is relatively low – $65 for micro entities, $130 for small businesses, and $260 for all others. Although ultimately you will need to file a non-provisional patent application in order to obtain a patent in the United States, the provisional application allows you to (1) have an effective filing date that a later non-provisional patent application, filed within 12 months, can claim priority to and (2) say that you have a “patent pending”, which can add more value to your business.

What are the benefits of applying for a provisional patent?

One of the key benefits of a provisional application is that it has few formal requirements, which can translate to a lower cost of obtaining early protection for your invention. As mentioned above, a provisional patent application does not require disclosing any patent claims. Because there is no examination process, an applicant will not have to incur legal fees in responding to “office actions” until after a non-provisional application is filed.

A related benefit of the provisional application is that it allows you to delay filing a non-provisional application for 12-months. A successful and valuable invention is often a work-in-progress, and this grace period can be very valuable for evaluating the merits of the invention and making improvements. While aspects of your invention may be sufficiently concrete and detailed for you to seek protection for, there are still parts that you may want to research and develop. One flexibility to a provisional application is that when you file a non-provisional application, you can claim the priority to multiple provisional applications so long as they are within the 12 months prior to your filing date. In other words, you can combine multiple iterations of your invention into a single document, which is beneficial if you’re still in the processing of developing and perfecting your invention.

In addition, this 12-month grace period can be especially helpful for small entrepreneurs or businesses that do not have the funds upfront to afford filing a non-provisional application. As mentioned earlier, the cost of filing a provisional application is relatively low, especially if you qualify as a micro-entity. Provisional applications allow you to immediately establish a filing date for your invention and to begin promoting and seeking additional funding for your invention without the worry that by disclosing your invention to others, you may lose your claim to your invention. Because the “novelty” of your invention is generally judged as of your filing date, this early filing date can have enormous benefits. By filing a provisional application (and within 12-months, the non-provisional application), if a patent is issued, you can claim priority to the date you filed the provisional application and exclude others from making, using or selling products that embody your invention.

What are the risks of filing a provisional patent application?

While a provisional patent application does not require many of the formalities (such as patent claims or formal drawings) of a non-provisional application, it still must be drafted with care. The provisional application must sufficiently enable and describe the invention that you will later claim in your non-provisional application. If the provisional application does not provide adequate description to enable the claims in non-provisional application, the claim will not be able to benefit from the provisional filing date. As a result, a public disclosure after the filing of the provisional application but before the filing of the non-provisional application could invalidate the claims. For more information about the risks of filing a provisional patent application, see our prior post on the risks of filing a “cover sheet provisional” application.

What are the next steps after filing a provisional patent application?

One important point to keep in mind is that filing a provisional patent application is just the first step towards obtaining protection for your invention. Ultimately, you still need to file a non-provisional patent application to obtain a patent, and to take advantage of the earlier filing date of the provisional application, you must file a non-provisional application within 12-months. Thus, if you’re planning on referencing multiple provisional applications, the critical date you want to file your non-provisional application by is 12-months from the filing date of the earliest provisional application to which you want to reference.

Lastly, so long as you do not run afoul of any of the statutory bars (e.g. offering to sell the invention or publicly disclosing the invention), even if you cannot file a non-provisional application within 12-months and claim priority to it, it will not cause you to lose what you have disclosed in your application because the provisional application is not published.

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